Monday, October 18, 2010

Arlington Site on the Civil War


I wanted to bring readers' attention to a new website on Arlington County and the Civil War.  (Thanks to the Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Facebook page for pointing this out.)  During the conflict, Arlington County was named Alexandria County.  Union troops occupied Arlington soon after Virginia approved the Ordinance of Secession and never left.  The county saw no major battles during the war, but the Union Army erected several forts in Arlington to defend Washington, including Fort Ethan Allen and Fort C.F. Smith.  The website will serve as a repository for material about Arlington during the war and will also highlight local events related to the Sesquicentennial.  See, Arlington is known for more than this!

6 comments:

Marianne said...

So, here's a fun sign to check out. There is a Confederate troop sign, place by the Daughter's of the Confederacy, I think, right by the Sunrise assisted living on Wilson Boulevard, near the W and OD trail and Four Mile Run. I think the Confederate troops camped there, not much else.

Ron said...

Thanks for the tip. I will have to check it out one of these days. (Do you know if it's on the Historical Marker Database?) I hope to write a few posts about Arlington and the war one of these days, starting with some of the forts.

Marianne said...

It is a Confederate outpost, right in front of Sunrise Assisted Living, there is a historical marker. I find that interesting because Union troops were so dominant in Arlington. It is a great location, though, because it is close to 7 corners and route 50. I know 7 corners had various tolls at the time, I wonder if it changed hands during the War?

Ron said...

Munson's Hill is located near Seven Corners, or at least what is left of it! During the summer/fall of 1861, the Confederates had constructed a fort there, where they were able to see all the way to downtown DC. The Union Army conducted various probes around the area, including at Bailey's Crossroads. McClellan had hoped to draw the Confederates into battle there, and force them to fall back. Instead, the Southern high command withdrew troops at the end of September 1861, and eventually established winter camp in Centreville.

Marianne said...

That's exactly what it is, Ron. I also find it interesting that there is an additional plaque there from the Daughter's of the Confederacy as well. You know me, I love irony, and the fact that Sunrise Assisted Living is right on the same spot seems very odd!

Ron said...

What irony! Wonder what Jeb Stuart and Little Mac would have thought! Unfortunately, far too many places in NoVA have such irony associated with them due to the lack of preservation in the face of sprawl.